Category Archives: Movies

7 14 21 28 35 42 49 56 and finally 63

The New York Times Magazine: Does Who You Are at 7 Determine Who You Are at 63? “In 1964, with “Seven Up!” Michael Apted stumbled into making what has become the most profound documentary series in the history of cinema. Fifty-five years later, the project is reaching its conclusion.”

“To spend time with a child is to dwell under the terms of an uneasy truce between the possibility of the present and the inevitability of the future. Our deepest hope for the children we love is that they will enjoy the liberties of an open-ended destiny, that their desires will be given the free play they deserve, that the circumstances of their birth and upbringing will be felt as opportunities rather than encumbrances; our greatest fear is that they will feel thwarted by forces beyond their control. At the same time, we can’t help poring over their faces and gestures for any signals of eventuality — the trace hints and betrayals of what will emerge in time as their character, their plot, their fate. And what we project forward for the children in our midst can rarely be disentangled from what we project backward for ourselves.”

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“Die Gleichberechtigung liegt ihr am Herzen”

Die Zeit: Frances McDormand: Die Unerschrockene. “Ungeschminkt und unabhängig: Frances McDormand zeigt, wie Hollywood aussehen könnte, wenn Frauen nur für ihre schauspielerische Leistung beurteilt würden.” Von Barbara Schweizerhof.

“Bei allen Verleihungen, egal wie glamourös sie waren, erschien die Schauspielerin fast ungeschminkt, die kurzen, grauen Haare nur nachlässig in Fasson gebracht, und in Kleidern, die in Form und Farbe das Gegenteil von dem waren, was man figurbetont oder sexy nennt. Wenn die Kamera während ihrer Dankesreden prominente Gesichter im Publikum zeigte, wurde der Kontrast noch deutlicher: Jessica Chastain, Sally Hawkins oder Carey Mulligan, Meryl Streep, Margot Robbie oder Emma Stone, alle mit sorgfältig aufgelegtem Fest-Make-up, Dekolletés und Glitzerlook, wirkten fast wie artige Püppchen gegenüber dieser Frau, die unerschrocken ihr Alter zeigt und schon vor Langem aufgehört hat, im herkömmlichen Sinn gefallen zu wollen.”

“She takes marginal characters and makes them the most robust people in the movie.”

The New York Times: Frances McDormand’s Difficult Women. “The actor has built a career, and a passionate fan base, playing supporting roles; now, at 60, she has become an unconventional star.” By Jordan Kisner.

“Frances McDormand, or Fran, as she is called in regular life, cuts a handsome figure on the street. She is 60 and sexy in the manner of women who have achieved total self-possession. She eschews makeup unless she is working, doesn’t dye her hair and despises the nips, tucks and lifts that have become routine for women of her profession. Her clothes are well made — she loves clothes — but utilitarian and comfortable. On this day she was wearing loose-legged cropped pants, black-and-peach sneakers, a navy sweater and a thin headband shoved in and out of uncombed hair as the mood struck.

She doesn’t do press junkets, and for most of the 20 years since she won a Best Actress Academy Award for playing Marge Gunderson, the tremendously pregnant, improbably cheerful police detective in “Fargo,” she has refused interviews. Her publicist explained to me that his job is to politely tell people to go away.”