Archive for the 'Science' Category

“He gave me a new vacuum cleaner to soften the blow.”

Monday, September 18th, 2017

The Moth Presents: Dr. Mary-Claire King at the World Science Festival. (YouTube, 12:32min)

If you prefer to read a transcript, you can find it here. Link via MetaFilter.

Raketen zum Selberbauen

Saturday, September 16th, 2017

Raketfued Rockets ist eine Website von Wasserraketen-Enthusiasten für Wasserraketen-Enthusiasten – und solche, die es werden wollen. Es wird erklärt, wie eine Wasserrakete funktioniert und wie man eine baut. Dafür gibt es eigens die Kategorie Anleitungen mit ebensolchen für Anfänger und Fortgeschrittene, mit PDF-Einkaufslisten und Erklärvideos. In diesem Zusammenhang sei auch die FAQ-Seite erwähnt, auf der Fragen zu Klebstoffen, Timern und verwendeten Materialien beantwortet werden. Außerdem findet man auf der Seite auch Aufnahmen von Wasserraketenstarts. Ach ja, und natürlich haben sie auch einen eigenen YouTube-Kanal.

Vor vielen Jahren habe ich mal eine Jugend-forscht-Arbeit zum Thema Wasserraketen betreut. Damals hätte uns die Website sehr weitergeholfen…

“Gosh, I’ve worked on Cassini for almost an entire Saturn year.”

Thursday, September 14th, 2017

BBC News: ‘Our Saturn years’. Cassini’s epic journey to the ringed planet, told by the people who helped make it happen. By Paul Rincon.

““The Voyagers gave us a really wonderful impression of Saturn. It’s a beautiful gas giant,” says Nasa’s director of planetary science Jim Green.

Prof Andrew Coates, from the Mullard Space Science Laboratory in Surrey, UK, agrees:

“Saturn is the most spectacular planet in our Solar System. The incredible rings, visible even in binoculars or a small telescope, make it stand out compared to all the rest.”

In places, the rings are only about as tall as a telephone pole. Yet from end-to-end they are more than 20-times as wide as the Earth. “

Link via MetaFilter.

“The Double C-Word”

Sunday, September 10th, 2017

The New York Times: President Trump’s War on Science.

“The news was hard to digest until one realized it was part of a much larger and increasingly disturbing pattern in the Trump administration. On Aug. 18, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine received an order from the Interior Department that it stop work on what seemed a useful and overdue study of the health risks of mountaintop-removal coal mining.

The $1 million study had been requested by two West Virginia health agencies following multiple studies suggesting increased rates of birth defects, cancer and other health problems among people living near big surface coal-mining operations in Appalachia. The order to shut it down came just hours before the scientists were scheduled to meet with affected residents of Kentucky.

The Interior Department said the project was put on hold as a result of an agencywide budgetary review of grants and projects costing more than $100,000.”

But there’s more:

“Last week, Mr. Trump nominated David Zatezalo, a former coal company chief executive who has repeatedly clashed with federal mine safety regulators, as assistant secretary of labor for the federal Mine Safety and Health Administration. He nominated Jim Bridenstine, a Republican congressman from Oklahoma with no science or space background, as NASA administrator. Sam Clovis, Mr. Trump’s nomination to be the Agriculture Department’s chief scientist, is not a scientist: He’s a former talk-radio host and incendiary blogger who has labeled climate research “junk science.””

Bildungsfernsehen

Friday, September 8th, 2017

Some links for you science teachers out there:

ESA: Mission 1: Newton in Space (English). “While on board the ISS, Pedro Duque was filmed conducting demonstrations explaining Newton’s Three Laws of Motion”.

ESA: Mission 2: Body Space (English). “During the DELTA Mission, André Kuipers performed a number of physiology demonstrations showing the effects of weightlessness on the human body”.

ESA: Mission 3: Space Matters (English). “During the Eneide Mission in 2005, Roberto Vittori was filmed conducting demonstrations designed to explore the different structures, states and properties of matter”.

star

Für die Physik-, Biologie- und Chemielehrer vor den Bildschirmen: Diese Filme der ESA wurden ursprünglich auf DVD herausgebracht, sind aber inzwischen auf YouTube angekommen.

ESA: Mission 1: Newton in Space (Deutsch). Pedro Duque führte auf der ISS Experimente durch, die Newtons drei Gesetze für Bewegungen verdeutlichen.

ESA: Mission 2: Body Space (Deutsch). Auf der DELTA-Mission führte André Kuipers einige physiologische Experimente durch, welche die Auswirkungen der Schwerelosigkeit auf den menschlichen Körper zeigen.

ESA: Mission 3: Space Matters (Deutsch). Während der Eneide-Mission 2005 wurde Roberto Vittori gefilmt, während er Versuche zum Aufbau von Materie, ihren Eigenschaften und den Aggregatzuständen durchführte.

(Den ersten Film habe ich schon oft im Mittelstufenunterricht eingesetzt. Die deutsche Synchronstimme ist zwar etwas nervig, ich warne meine Schüler immer vor.)