Category Archives: Computer

Tables, tables, tables

Tables Generator lets you create tables for LaTeX or HTML documents

“Entering tables in LaTeX documents can be burdensome because of the necessary formatting directives. For this purpose we created this online generator which (hopefully) will allow you to generate LaTeX code you can just copy & paste into your document’s source. Our editor is close to WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Got) principle, i.e. the table displayed in the editor should resemble the final table.
[…]
Creating tables in HTML seems to be somewhat easier than in LaTeX, the syntax is simpler but more verbose. There are countless tools available which allow you to create tables in HTML format, nevertheless if you just need a quick and simple tool you may use the generator on our site. It supports features like cells merging, text align and some simple styling.”

I found this site the other day while trying to typset a table for a math test in LaTeX in which I needed merged cells across several rows and columns. Worked like a charm!

Long live my RSS reader!

Brent Simmons: Historical code: NetNewsWire Lite 4.0 and New World NetNewsWire. “I don’t know what to do about NetNewsWire 3.3.2, which was the last release of the non-Lite full version. That code is really, really old and I don’t even really want to publish it. But I might. Or I might get it building and release a 3.4 version of it.”

“My goal used to be to make NetNewsWire a great Mac app with lots of paying users. Secondary goals were to promote reading and writing on the web, the blogosphere, and RSS and open web standards.
My goal now is to make NetNewsWire a great Mac app with lots of users. Other, no-less-important, goals are to:

  • Promote healthier news-reading via the open web and RSS
  • Promote native Mac app development by providing a good example and by making the code open source

(Yes, I’m strongly considering an iOS version, but I’m concentrating on the Mac app first.)”

I’ve been a NetNewsWire user since way-back-when, and I’m still using it to this day – version 3.2.15, to be exact. I don’t use it to read news, but I subscribe to the feeds of 272 websites, weblogs etc., and I’m still a huge fan of NetNewsWire. Thanks, Brent, for putting in the effort to re-create NetNewsWire!

I like paper and pencils

Computerphile: Why Electronic Voting is a BAD Idea. (YouTube, 8:20min) “Voting is centuries old, why can’t we move with the times and use our phones, tablets and computers? Tom Scott lays out why e-voting is such a bad idea.”

“[Electronic voting] is a terrible idea. And if a government ever promises to use it, hope they don’t manage it before you get a chance to vote them out.”

PBS News Hour: An 11-year-old changed election results on a replica Florida state website in under 10 minutes.

Link via MetaFilter.

It’s a spherical video in a mathematically triplified space with symmetry in space-time

Vihart: Peace for Triple Piano. (YouTube 3D video, 4:15min)

This has got to be one of the most amazing things done with a 3D camera I’ve ever seen. Pro tip: Watch this in fullscreen mode on your phone so you can look around by moving the entire phone, and use headphones to get the full 3D sound effect as well.

Make sure to also watch

Henry Segerman: The Making of “Peace for Triple Piano”. (YouTube video, 13:52min including a “flat” version of the above 3D video).

In this video Vi Hart and Henry Sergerman explain how the video works: how they made one grand piano and one Vi look like three, but one Henry look like only two at the same time.

Vi writes a little more about this project on her weblog: Vihart.com: Peace for Triple Piano.

(This was published back in February, but I only now realized that the RSS feed of this YouTube channel stopped working.)

Superhero-vision camera

NPR all tech considered: Super Sensitive Sensor Sees What You Can’t.

“A team of engineers at Dartmouth College has invented a semiconductor chip that could someday give the camera in your phone the kind of vision even a superhero would envy. […] Fossum calls his new technology QIS, for Quanta Image Sensor. Instead of pixels, QIS chips have what Fossum and his colleagues call “jots.” Each jot can detect a single particle of light, called a photon.”