Archive for the 'Wildlife' Category

Wood Wide Web

Monday, October 10th, 2016

Peter Wohlleben auf SWR4: Das geheime Leben der Bäume. (YouTube, knapp 18 Minuten)

“Bäume sprechen miteinander, sie haben ein kollektives Gedächtnis. Klingt unglaublich, ist aber wissenschaftlich belegt. SWR4 Redakteur Lars Michael Storm und Filmemacher Beat von Stein haben Förster Peter Wohlleben in seinem Wald getroffen.”

Das gleichnamige Buch habe ich vor einer Weile gelesen und fand es sehr informativ und interessant. Leseempfehlung!

Siehe auch Peter Wohlleben im Dialog mit Michael Krons am 08.11.2015 (YouTube, 35 Minuten).

Visitor

Friday, September 2nd, 2016

Today I saw this guy sitting on the wall of our house, right next to the front door. (He didn’t ring the bell, though.)

zauneidechse

It is a Sand Lizard aka Zauneidechse.

I like Podcasts

Tuesday, August 2nd, 2016

humanature-smallOne of my new favourite podcasts is the HumaNature podcast from Wyoming Public Media. Their first season has ten episodes, all of which you can download for free from their website. If you want to see if you like it before subscribing, listen to the bonus episode: Season 1 Recap.

Bears!

Wednesday, July 6th, 2016

Explore Bears: Brooks Falls – Katmai National Park, Alaska powered by EXPLORE.org (live stream on YouTube).

If you watch for a little while, you’ll see salmon jumping up the falls, and a bear or two might appear to catch some. When I started watching, a brown bear nonchalantly walked into the water, caught a salmon with his mouth on the first try and nonchalantly walked out again. Right now there’s a mother with two cubs – amazing! The mom is jumping in the water again and again, but the cubs are just standing in shallow water watching her and not quite sure what to make of the whole thing.

They will adjust the camera angle and zoom depending on where the action is happening.

Link via MetaFilter.

Shhh…

Thursday, June 30th, 2016

NPR Science: Beyond Sightseeing: You’ll Love The Sound Of America’s Best Parks.

“Every place has its own sound. A small group of scientists is hard at work recording the natural sounds of national parks all across the U.S. — more than 70 soundscapes so far.

For our series on the centennial of the national parks, we traveled to Colorado, to find out how they create these portraits of sound.”

I recommend listening to the seven minute article instead of just reading the (abbreviated, loose) transcript because there are a lot of sound clips.