Category Archives: Community

A picture-perfect Hebridean island

The Economist: Scottish islanders are buying out their lairds. “But remote settlements will need more than new owners to survive.”

“In June Ulva was bought by its residents, a result of sweeping land reform by the Scottish government. “For the first time, the people who live on the island will get to decide what happens to it,” declared Rebecca Munro, an islander.

When Ulva was put on the market last year, Mrs Munro and her family feared that a new landlord might terminate their tenancies. A brochure portrayed the island as a private playground, they said, listing the dates when tenants could be evicted. Community ownership, by contrast, suggests security and self-determination. But the fate of fragile and marginal places depends on more than land changing hands.

Who owns what, and why, has a particular emotional pull in Scotland. Half the country’s private land is owned by fewer than 500 people. Nationalists view this as a legacy of English colonialism, which saw the appropriation of land that under the clan system had been mutually owned. The clearances of the 18th and 19th centuries, when rich landowners forcibly evicted poor tenants to make way for sheep farming, loom large in the cultural imagination.”

Huffington Post: Meet The Island Communities Fighting Back Against Wealthy, Absent Landlords. “These tiny Scottish communities are taking control of their own destinies.” (Includes a 10min video worth watching.)

“Eigg is one of the Scottish Small Isles, an archipelago of islands a few miles off the country’s west coast, and when Fyffe arrived, the population was at an all-time low of 39.

The island was owned by businessman and former Olympic bobsleigher Keith Schellenberg. Schellenberg had bought Eigg in 1975 for the equivalent of $360,000 (274,000 pounds), and despite some initial investment, things had progressively declined. In an interview with the West Highland Free Press in 1991, he enthused that under his ownership the island had kept its “slightly rundown … Hebridean feel.”

Fyffe and her neighbors saw it differently. “We were in extreme circumstances,” she says. “With no security of tenure, no one was investing; the community hall was falling apart; the only shop was in a corrugated shed with no water or electricity.”

Fed up and desperate for change, the community decided to do something about it. When Schellenberg’s divorce led to the island being put on the market, Eigg passed briefly to a German artist, before the newly formed Isle of Eigg Trust raised $1.97 million to buy it ― one-third from hundreds of small donations and two-thirds from a woman who has remained anonymous to this day. Last year, Eigg celebrated its 20th anniversary of community ownership.”

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Kinder sind Flüchtlingen gegenüber offen

Deutsche Welle: Deutsche Kinder offen gegenüber Flüchtlingen. “Eine Befragung zeigt, dass deutsche Mädchen und Jungen es gut finden, dass ihr Land Geflüchteten ein Zuhause bietet. Bei Kindern in ostdeutschen Bundesländern ist die Zustimmung allerdings geringer.”

“Die Mehrheit der deutschen Kinder steht der Aufnahme von Flüchtlingen in Deutschland offen gegenüber. Das ergab das LBS Kinderbarometer 2018, dass die Landesbausparkassen der Sparkasse (LBS) am Donnerstag, dem Internationalen Tag für Toleranz der UNESCO, veröffentlichten. Drei Viertel der befragten Kinder zwischen 9 und 14 Jahren gaben an, sie fänden es gut, dass Deutschland Menschen aufnimmt, die aus anderen Ländern geflohen waren.”

“What is now called resisting is often Americans simply helping others: a concept so alien to the Trump administration that it is labelled as subversive.”

The Globe and Mail Opinion, by Sarah Kendzior: The resistance to Donald Trump is not what you think. “There is no unified, hierarchical group on the periphery trying to overthrow the U.S. government. There are only regular people, in every city, hoping for better, and trying to rescue the America they once knew”.
Sarah Kendzior is the author of The View From Flyover Country and the co-host of the podcast Gaslit Nation.

“There is no question that most Americans disapprove of Mr. Trump and the GOP. The question for November is whether dissent matters in the face of an increasingly autocratic regime, one whose disregard for rule of law is unparalleled in U.S. history, and one that may have engaged in voter suppression and one whose associates are being investigated for whether they collaborated with operatives of hostile states to win the previous election. The midterms have become an existential matter: Will we salvage our damaged democracy, or lose what rights remain? For non-white Americans, immigrants, women, LGBTQ Americans and other groups targeted by the administration, there is nothing abstract about this inquiry.

I spent most of the year on the road in America, and I don’t think we, as a people, are as cruel or mercenary as those who represent us. Political activists and Democrats are not as disorganized as pundits claim. Everything sounds confusing when you listen for a coherent message, and what you hear instead is an anguished cry. But at least that cry is honest. That cry means people still care. The worst sound, these days, is silence.”

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Der fotografierende Rettungssanitäter

ze.tt: 30 Jahre später: Fotograf zeigt mit Damals-heute-Fotos, wie sich Menschen verändern. “Chris Porsz fotografierte in den Siebzigern und Achtzigern Passant*innen auf den Straßen seiner Heimatstadt in Ost-England. Sein Projekt zeigt, welche Auswirkungen es auf eine Gesellschaft und ihre Menschen hat, wenn die Zeit vergeht.” Mit 27 Fotos von damals und heute.

Urheberrechtsreform in der EU

Die Zeit: Europa-Abgeordnete stimmen für Reform des Urheberrechts. “Google oder YouTube sollen Künstler vergüten, wenn deren Inhalte auf ihren Plattformen angeboten werden. Kritiker fürchten Zensur durch die Urheberrechtsreform.”

Die Zeit: Urheberrechtsreform: Diese Überschrift dürfen Sie künftig nicht mehr zitieren. “Die Lobbyarbeit ist aufgegangen: Die EU-Urheberrechtsreform belohnt die Verlage. Für uns alle ist sie desaströs. Die freie Verbreitung von Informationen ist in Gefahr.” Ein Kommentar von Lisa Hegemann.

Wenn diese Urheberrechtsreform in dieser Form in Kraft tritt, kann ich – zusammen mit allen anderen Webloggern in der EU – mein Blog dichtmachen. Dann dürfte ich nämlich hier statt dem obigen Text nur schreiben:

Hier, lest mal diesen Artikel und den Kommentar dazu auf Zeit online. Es geht um die Reform des EU-Urheberrechts.